Children’s Audiobooks 7+

The world of reality has its limits; the world of imagination is boundless.”

— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

With the summer holidays fast approaching, there is plenty of time to develop the world of our imagination.  We find audiobooks a great way of immersing ourselves in stories, so here are some we’ve enjoyed this year that you might like for your travels: Continue reading

Victorian Historical Fiction 6+

As promised in last week’s post on World War II Historical Fiction, I’ve put a list together of literature set during the Victorian times that my daughter has pulled off our bookshelves. Continue reading

WWII Historical Fiction 6+

The evacuees were to sleep in the big attic room with dark beams overhead.  It was chilly and had no electric light or carpets but there was a nice woody smell.  A curtain hung down the middle.  Joyce, Patsy and Winnie were together on one side and Lenny was alone on the other.

The Lion and the Unicorn, Shirley Hughes

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An Afternoon with Michael Morpurgo

Just before Easter we got to hear Michael Morpurgo live in conversation with Nicolette Jones at the Sheldonian as part of the Oxford Literary Festival. Morpurgo is one of my son’s favourite authors and was speaking on his birthday, so it was an ideal birthday outing.  The conversation covered topics from the personal to the political and engaged all ages.  

However there were three things that he emphasised as being key for today’s children: Continue reading

Visiting Rome

“Rome, the city of visible history.”

— George Elliot

If you follow us on Instagram you’ll know that we’ve just got back from an amazing few days in Rome. George Elliot is spot on. Rome certainly is “the city of visible history”. Wherever  we looked – whether up at the domes, down the cobbled alleyways or strolling around the Colosseum – history was there.

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Introducing Shakespeare

We probably read Shakespeare in the first place for his stories, afterwards for his characters, the multitude of delightful persons with whom he makes us so intimate that afterwards, in fiction or in fact, we say, ‘She is another Jessica,’ and ‘That dear girl is a Miranda’; ‘She is a Cordelia to her father,’ and, such a figure in history, ‘a base lago.’ To become intimate with Shakespeare in this way is a great enrichment of mind and instruction of conscience. Then, by degrees, as we go on reading this world-teacher, lines of insight and beauty take possession of us, and unconsciously mould our judgments of men and things and of the great issues of life.

— Charlotte Mason

It feels as though we have just taken the lid off a treasure chest as we have opened William Shakespeare together this term. Continue reading

A Summer of STEM* Projects

Guest Writer Michelle Dobbie lives and homeschools her two boys in South London.  Here she shares some beautiful ways to teach STEM* subjects in our homes and schools. Continue reading

Master Storyteller Michael Morpurgo

Oxford is feeling very autumnal.

The holidays are nearly over.

We have got building work beginning on our house tomorrow morning!

But before I think to the term ahead, I wanted to share some of the books I’ve read over the summer.  My older two have loved passing on some of their favourites to me and we have had lovely conversations over meals or on car drives comparing thoughts on characters or plots.  Michael Morpurgo became Continue reading

Artist of the Term: Michelangelo

Every child should leave school with at least a couple of hundred pictures by great masters hanging permanently in the halls of his imagination . . . 

— Charlotte Mason

Last term our ‘artist of the term’ was the magnificent Michelangelo di Ludovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564).  This was a treat, if a little brief for such an artistic giant – sculptor, painter, architect and poet.

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