Introducing Shakespeare

We probably read Shakespeare in the first place for his stories, afterwards for his characters, the multitude of delightful persons with whom he makes us so intimate that afterwards, in fiction or in fact, we say, ‘She is another Jessica,’ and ‘That dear girl is a Miranda’; ‘She is a Cordelia to her father,’ and, such a figure in history, ‘a base lago.’ To become intimate with Shakespeare in this way is a great enrichment of mind and instruction of conscience. Then, by degrees, as we go on reading this world-teacher, lines of insight and beauty take possession of us, and unconsciously mould our judgments of men and things and of the great issues of life.

— Charlotte Mason

It feels as though we have just taken the lid off a treasure chest as we have opened William Shakespeare together this term. Continue reading

Artist of the Term: J.M.W.Turner

Turner has some golden visions, glorious and beautiful. They are only visions, but still, they are art, and one could live and die with such pictures.

John Constable on the 1828 Royal Academy Exhibition.

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The Nutcracker Extravaganza

I know it’s only just November! But I thought I’d share one of my plans for the rest of term.  In the lead up to Christmas we are going to go ‘Nutcracker’ crazy!

Tchaikovsky’s perfect seasonal ballet. Continue reading

A Summer of STEM* Projects

Guest Writer Michelle Dobbie lives and homeschools her two boys in South London.  Here she shares some beautiful ways to teach STEM* subjects in our homes and schools. Continue reading

Master Storyteller Michael Morpurgo

Oxford is feeling very autumnal.

The holidays are nearly over.

We have got building work beginning on our house tomorrow morning!

But before I think to the term ahead, I wanted to share some of the books I’ve read over the summer.  My older two have loved passing on some of their favourites to me and we have had lovely conversations over meals or on car drives comparing thoughts on characters or plots.  Michael Morpurgo became Continue reading

Artist of the Term: Michelangelo

Every child should leave school with at least a couple of hundred pictures by great masters hanging permanently in the halls of his imagination . . . 

— Charlotte Mason

Last term our ‘artist of the term’ was the magnificent Michelangelo di Ludovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564).  This was a treat, if a little brief for such an artistic giant – sculptor, painter, architect and poet.

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Easter Traditions (part 2)

Having grown up in a Russian Orthodox home, Lent and Easter was a time filled with traditions (mostly involving food!) that we enjoyed year on year. I have warm memories of these and have continued many on with my own family as well as adding some more along the way.

Here are some of our Easter traditions:

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Easter Traditions (part 1)

With Easter fast approaching I’ve been thinking about traditions.

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Traditions and celebrations throughout the year are important to our family – patterns of life that give shape to the onward movement of time.  Traditions that we repeat and seasons we observe situate us within a different mode of time – one that is more like a circle than a line –  bringing us back to times and places we have been to before.

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